Skip to content

Palm Tree Tea Posts

Dakar Style : A Photo Story

The fashion here is like no other I’ve seen; from the mixing and matching of vibrant colours and patterns, statement motifs, creative use of headscarves, and elegant tunic and trouser combinations, the result is truly distinctive.

People take great care over the way they dress, and the greatest amount of attention is paid to details such as the cut of a sleeve, the embroidery of a neckline, or the embellishment of a headscarf. Taking pride in your appearance is not only a sign of respect for yourself but a sign of respect for others, and people find creative ways to look good on any budget.

The widespread availability and immense choice of fabrics from all over the continent and beyond, as well as highly skilled tailors make it easy to get an original outfit tailored for everyday use or special occasions.

The overall effect is a blend of West African meets Western, North African and Arabian influences and a je ne sais quois that the Senegalese add by virtue of their instinctive ability to coordinate a show-stopping outfit.

Recently I took to the streets of Dakar with Yasmin of travel and design blog Yasmin Tells to photograph some of the city’s most  inspirational style offerings, the results of which are the photos you see below. I hope you enjoy our insight into the inimitable world of Senegalese style.

street-style-1

street-style-3

street-style-10

street-style-6

street-style-2

stree-style-4

street-style-7

street-style-5

street-style-9

street-style-8

Leave a Comment

Six Bougies: Personal and Home Accessories Set to the Backdrop of West Africa

If you’re interested in textiles, a trip to Dakar will feel like you’ve hit the jackpot. You’ll find a dazzling array of fabrics from across the region at huge, never-ending markets such as HLM, high-end boutiques, roadside stalls, and even in your local corner shop.

The choice of fabrics and ease of being able to produce high-quality items by excellent tailors was one of the reasons which inspired Kim Rochette and Megan Carpenter to start Six Bougies, a Dakar based home décor and personal accessories range that fuses West African textiles and patterns with a Western aesthetic. Rebecca Hughes came onboard in 2015, after Megan left Dakar.

Inspired by the light and colours of West Africa, this brand has a fresh, global feel. A couple of their bogolan fabric pillows can easily add elegance and interest to a drab sofa, or a pop of their signature turquoise and coral in the form of a clutch bag livens-up a plain outfit. Their simple, clean, designs let the amazing fabrics speak for themselves.

Recently, I spoke to this lovely, talented and textile-crazy pair to find out more about their company, their design inspirations, and to get some insider tips on buying fabric in Dakar.

Where did the idea for Six Bougies come from?

K: When we first came to Dakar, we were captivated by the selection of fabrics and textiles from all over West Africa, and loved the ability to have clothing and accessories custom-made. We began contemplating the idea of a small business sourcing fabrics and commissioning clothes and accessories from local tailors and in 2013, Six Bougies was born!

What are some of your design inspirations?

R: We’re inspired by the vibrant colours and patterns we see in the city. We love how Senegalese men and women are bold and fearless with their colour choices and put intricate, elaborate detail into custom-made outfits for everyday wear. Six Bougies aims to translate this local inspiration into original, daring clothing, accessory and home décor designs that will appeal to Senegalese and international clients alike.

Man modelling a red Six Bougies wax print tie.

Six Bougies pink patterened duffel bag.
Wax print tie (top) and wax and bogolan duffel bag

K: I’ve lived in Senegal for six years and definitely agree with Becky on the colour and personal style so prominent in Dakar. I’m also very inspired by the use of colour and design in unexpected places like on car rapides, pirogues, and in mosques. The tropical climate also serves as inspiration as it lends itself to an indoor/outdoor, laidback style both for clothing and home décor.

What makes Six Bougies unique?

K: We aim for impeccable design and quality, ethically made and at a reasonable price. Our signature aesthetic features unexpected textile, pattern and colour combinations, while maintaining a classic, fresh style.

R: We’re especially committed to using locally made fabrics as often as possible such as indigo, bogolan, woven fabric and wax prints produced in Africa (woodin, uniwax etc.) and are devoted to supporting the local garment industry.

A selection of Six Bougies pillows on a sofa.

What is your all-time favourite Six Bougies product?

R: I love our pagne tissé clutch. I use mine all the time and it’s great for travelling as it fits my passport and other important documents while still looking stylish.

K: I love wearing a flowy blouse we make with Mauritanian voile fabric; it’s breezy and comfortable, perfect for a hot climate or layered under a cardigan. I’m also obsessed with pillows, and I love all our pillow designs – bogolan, indigo, pagne tissé, and wax alike!

Rebecca Hughes modelling a Mauritanian voile fabric Six Bougies top in blue.

Pink and blue Six Bougies Pagne Tisse clutch bag on wooden table.
Mauritanian voile fabric top (above) and pagne tissé clutch bag

What are the home décor trends you’re loving right now?

R: In the home décor world, mudcloth pillows are currently super popular. I like this trend because they’re neutral but still offer a “global” pop, and can easily be mixed with other colours.

K: Indigo is becoming increasingly popular as well. In general, I love white/neutral walls and bringing in colour and pattern through global, textured home décor accessories like pillows, throws, baskets and decorative items. I see this style a lot on home décor blogs, especially in Californian and Australian homes.

Six Bougies co-founders Rebecca Hughes and Kim Rochette with their favourite indigo supplier at Soumbedioune market in Dakar.
Rebecca and Kim with their indigo supplier at Soumbedioune market in Dakar

What are the most challenging aspects of running a business?

R: Since Kim and I both have other careers, it can be challenging to balance a second job on top of our other responsibilities.

And the most rewarding?

R: The most rewarding aspect is the design process as well as working with our team of artisans. I love imagining the colour combination possibilities.

K: I agree, building relationships with artisans has been very important. And, of course, seeing the fruit of that collaborative process feels pretty great – especially spotting a Six Bougies blouse on the streets of Dakar! Knowing that people share our design aesthetic, value ethical shopping, and are enjoying Six Bougies products – there’s nothing more rewarding to me.

A tailor sewing pillows with a Singer sewing machine

Two female tailors at work
(From top) Six Bougies Tailors Bouba, Penda and Adji

How does Six Bougies give back to the local community?

R: In a big-picture sense, we are a socially-responsible business providing employment to local tailors and supporting the local garment industry.

K: The name Six Bougies comes from an iconic Vlisco wax fabric representative of female empowerment. Giving back to the local community – particularly women and families – has been a key part of the Six Bougies ethos from day one. As the company grows, we hope to formalise this commitment and brainstorm specific community projects beyond employing local artisans at above-market price. For now, clients can rest assured that they are purchasing ethically-made products that are directly supporting the local workforce.

What’s next for Six Bougies and where do you see the brand going in the next five years?

R: We’re scaling up! With the launch of our new website very soon, we hope to increase our sales overseas as well as create more of an internet presence.

K: We’re also hoping to work with more international wholesale clients to sell at a larger scale, ultimately bringing more jobs to our Senegalese tailors and artisans and hopefully leading to some meaningful community projects. Our co-founder Megan is now based in Los Angeles, and is setting up our international marketing on the West coast of the United States.

A stack of pink pagne tisse fabric.
Pagne tissé

And lastly, I can’t let you go without giving Palm Tree Tea readers some insider tip on buying textiles in Dakar!

K: Of course! Sourcing textiles is one of my favourite parts of Six Bougies. Dakar has tons of great places for hunting unique and beautiful textiles; for wax, I recommend HLM, of course, but Sandaga actually has a diverse and great selection as well, particularly of wax from Benin. For indigo and bogolan, I recommend Soumbedioune market.

R: I love ACOMA, it’s a co-op of weavers who came together in the 1980s. They weave all their fabric on site, and have a boutique there as well. They do custom orders and we try to work with them as often as we can. They’re located in Point E, right near the Ali Baba restaurant on the Rue de Ouakam.

 

Six Bougies is available to buy in Dakar at Keur Marie Ganaar, the arts and crafts cooperative in Mermoz. International orders can be placed through their Etsy shop, and you can also find them on Facebook and Instagram.

1 Comment

A Dakar Apartment Tour

img_9079

After two years, our apartment is finally starting to come together. I feel like we’ve managed to create a simple, stylish, yet comfortable space on a budget, something which can be quite hard to do in an expensive city like Dakar.

I thought I’d share some hints and tips on how we achieved a chic, yet affordable look.

img_9048

We had almost all our furniture made by a great local carpenter. The rest, we were lucky enough to inherit from family who were leaving. We find having furniture made using strong and sturdy local wood lasts much longer than the more expensive items you find at big department stores.

img_9007
Colourful Ghanaian throw on the sofa.

As it’s a rental apartment and we can’t change the walls, we used colourful, mainly African-inspired accessories like pillows, throws, rugs and baskets to add pops of colours to the neutral background.

img_8927

In one corner we have a couple of rainbow-coloured storage baskets which not only look pretty but are extremely useful for tidying away bits and pieces. We use them to store books, magazines and blankets for those (rare) chilly nights.

img_8960
I love succulents as they’re so easy to look after and do well in this climate. I put these into glass and steel bowls and added some colourful stones around the cactus.
img_9043
Our coffee table is actually two benches from our dining table pushed together. We almost always use them in this way, unless we’re having people over for dinner.
img_8950
Fairy lights along the top of the living room door add some sparkle at night-time.

Our hallway is quite spacious so we decided to use it as a separate dining room. We had this chunky wooden table and benches made by our carpenter.

img_9096

img_9106

img_9073

These glasses were formerly pasta sauce jars. They don’t break as easily as normal glasses, look lovely, and of course come free with your next pasta meal!

I hope you enjoyed this little insight into our living space. Let me know if you have any money-saving décor tips in the comments, and also if you would like to see more posts like this in the future.

Décor Details

White candles from Casino supermarket, wooden table and benches made by carpenter, curtain rails made by carpenter, curtain fabric bought and curtains made at Decotex, cream coloured rug from Orca, plates from shop next to Ouakam Market (a bargain at only 1000 CFA each!), catci and storage baskets bought from roadside vendors.

Don’t forget to subscribe to Palm Tree Tea by adding your email address to the form on right!

Leave a Comment

Karité: The West African Wonder Balm

With one single pot of Karité (or Shea Butter as it’s more commonly known) you would be well equipped to deal with most of your skin and haircare needs, and many of your medicinal ones too. This multi-purpose wonder balm, a staple in most West African homes, is truly a superfood for the skin.

Karitè nuts, photo by Andrea Moroni
Karitè nuts, photo by Andrea Moroni

Karité is an edible oil that comes from the nut of the Karité tree, a species indigenous to West and Central Africa. As it’s extracted by hand, the oil retains all of its amazing natural properties such as vitamins A and E and essential fatty acids, which are the key to its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and healing powers.

When raw and unprocessed, it’s thick and golden, with a wonderfully sweet, minty smell. It’s sold at markets all over West Africa in huge slabs, of which smaller pieces are sliced off. Though solid, like a bar of soap, it melts easily when rubbed into warm hands for a few seconds.

IMG_8848
Karitè at the Malian market in Dakar
IMG_8841
The Karitè I purchased was being kept wrapped in a tree root to preserve its freshness

Women in the region have known about its beautifying and anti-aging properties for thousands of years; it provides deep moisture for dry skin and hair.

IMG_8879

Karitè is an excellent moisturiser for dry and curly hair
Karitè is an excellent moisturiser for dry and curly hair

Because it’s anti-inflammatory, it helps soothe a host of skin conditions such as acne, scars, stretch marks, psoriasis and eczema. And as its 100% natural, it’s suitable for even the most sensitive of skins, as evidenced by its widespread use for baby massage, and protecting against nappy rash.

IMG_8874
I use Karitè as a lip balm and on the delicate neck and chest area as it has low levels of naturally occurring UV to help protect against the sun

IMG_8896

Karité also has medicinal properties; it soothes muscle pains and works wonders when rubbed into an aching lower back. It can help ease cold symptoms when rubbed into the chest, and sinus congestion in the nose. Mildly antiseptic, you can even use it as an ointment for minor cuts, burns and insect bites.

Karité is, quite simply, a miracle product. I’m not sure how I ever managed without it!

You can find Karité at markets across West Africa. US based company 24KariteGold produce high quality 100% raw and wild crafted Shea butter, made for them by a women’s cooperative in Ghana. By purchasing this product you actively support a sustainable economy for the women employed at the cooperative and their families.

Don’t forget to subscribe to Palm Tree Tea by adding your email address to the form on right!

2 Comments

10 Tips for Life in Dakar

1.Walk Downtown on a Sunday. On a Sunday, you can wander peacefully around downtown Dakar (Plateau) to your heart’s content, without having to dodge traffic. Discover old colonial architecture on the roads around Rue Jules Ferry and Marché Kermel, and explore the Corniche (coast road) for spectacular views of Gorée Island and the beach at Anse Bernard.     

anse-bernard-dakar-001

2.Get to Know Your BBBs. This stands for Brochettes de Lotte, Beach and Bissap (or Beer!). If you’re wondering how to spend a free afternoon, this simple formula always works: find a place with a sea view, order some tasty fish kebabs along with your refreshing beverage of choice and you’ll have a wonderfully restorative couple of hours. Try the seafood shacks at Pointe des Almadies, Africa’s westernmost point.

brochette-chips

3.Enjoy the Nightlife (during the day). Dakar is famous for its nightlife, but the best of the action doesn’t normally start before 1am. If you find it hard to stay up that late, doesn’t mean you have to miss out. Look on listings websites like Agendakar to see what’s on during the day. Places like Goethe Institute in Point E often have concerts and other cultural events in the afternoons or early evenings, and they’re usually free.

IMG_1683

4.Love Your Neighbour. Community is important here, and it’s worth taking the time to get to know your neighbours and people you see on a daily basis. These are the folks who will brighten your day by offering you a cup of Attaya (traditional tea) or who will bring you home-cooked food for absolutely no reason at all.

5.Find Your Secret Spot. Mine is Le Calao, next to the Ngor Dioarama. It’s a nondescript blink-and-you’ll-miss-it hotel which has a stunning surprise at the end of its long driveway; a beautiful natural rock pool which looks out to Ngor Island. Perfect for a quiet swims and peaceful sunsets. Never crowded.

IMG_8062
The Rock pool at Le Calao

6.Eat Communal. Something I’d never done before coming to Dakar but now counts as one of my favourite activities is to eat around a communal food bowl. It’s a fun and relaxed way of eating that never fails to bring people closer together.

IMG_1439

7.Get Culturally Orientated. Gather a group of work colleagues or friends together and spend half a day having a fun, but in-depth workshop on all aspects of Senegalese culture at the ACI Baobab Center, including the etiquette for sharing a communal food bowl and the proper way to do greetings and goodbyes. You will feel instantly more confident in settling in when you know some of the cultural subtleties that might otherwise take years to discover.

418095833_64605e1465_o
Photo by Angela Sevin

8.Try Something New. Sabar drumming, African dance, Batik dyeing, Kora lessons; there are plenty of unique activities on offer here that will challenge your body and mind, and keep you entertained. Take advantage of your surroundings and try something different!

DSC_0127

9.Find Your Hole in the Wall. For tasty and inexpensive home-cooked food, look for places that get packed out at lunchtimes and join the queue. Le Prestige in Ouakam does a great Yassa Poulet (find it at the top of the road that goes from the Monument to the Brioche Dorée) and I have it on good authority that Mme Fatou Mbengue’s roadside stand is the go-to place for some of the tastiest Thieboudienne in Mermoz at 700 CFA per plate.

Le Prestige
Le Prestige

10.Get out often! Dakar can sometimes feel overwhelming, so make sure to take a break when you can. Head up the coast to a lovely spot like this, or if you’re pressed for time Ngor and Goree Islands provide the perfect quick escapes. Rest, re-charge and come back with a new appreciation for what this fantastic city has to offer.

View of Dakar from Ngor Island
5 Comments

Storks, Sardines and Street Art : The Quirky Charm of Portimão

IMG_1710

This post delves into new territory by exploring Portimão in the Algarve region of Southern Portugal, a place that has captured my heart with its easy-going atmosphere and off-beat charm.

Portimão is very much a working town. It has its postcard pretty parts, its grittier parts, and a fiercely strong sense of identity linked to its industrial past, making it feel different from other more tourist-orientated parts of this highly popular region.

It’s an intriguing jumble of architectural styles; striking modern buildings such as the silver armadillo shaped arena sit alongside whitewashed 19th century factory worker’s cottages, all the while enveloped by the natural beauty of the rolling green mountains of the Algarve.

IMG_1732

IMG_1776

IMG_1800

IMG_1803

The Portimonense are proud of their heritage as an important centre for sardine canning and fishing, and have carefully preserved the distinctive red-brick smokestacks from the old factories, which have been incorporated into the fabric of the town as it has grown and developed.

With the factories long closed down, the smokestacks have now developed another important use; they provide the perfect place for Storks to make their nests and every single one is now inhabited by a family of these elegant, long-limbed birds.

IMG_1704

IMG_1745

IMG_1814

Storks, sardines, fishing and fado (the traditional music of Portugal) are all motifs that can be found in the vivid graffiti and street-art dotted around the town.

IMG_1806

IMG_1781

IMG_1749

IMG_1807

The seafood in Portimão is almost indescribably flavoursome. More than just tasting freshly caught, it tastes like it’s still in the sea. The trick, says a local chef, is using sea water to prepare the fish before cooking it, which means it absorbs all the intense sea flavours and doesn’t need much seasoning beyond garlic, olive oil and lemon.

Locally caught Sardines, grilled the traditional way on charcoal and served with a tasty Algarvian salad (chopped tomatoes, cucumber, onions, oregano) make a mouth-wateringly simple and inexpensive meal.

IMG_1827

As well as long, languorous seafood meals, another good use of time is to pause for a coffee (called a Bica) and a flaky and delicious Portuguese custard tart (Pastel de Nata) to watch the procession of tourists, fishermen, and other assorted local characters as you while away an afternoon in one of the town’s shaded squares.

IMG_1754

IMG_1783

Portimão is a great destination for those looking for a calm and fuss-free getaway. Come here to eat home-cooked food, for simple pleasures like strolling along the harbour or people watching over coffee and pastries, to use the town as a base for exploring the many fishing villages and beaches dotted along the Algarve coast and of course, to eat the best sardines of your life.

It’s a low-key and laidback place where you can enjoy the famously relaxed and friendly hospitality of the Portuguese. Throw in the affordability factor (travelling here, staying here and eating here) and you have the perfect ingredients for a restorative break that won’t break the bank.

Where to eat

Peixarada – The best seafood and friendliest service in town – Largo da Barca, Tel: 282 484 175.

Pastelaria Arade – A historic tearoom serving Algarvian sweets and pastries – Largo 1º de Dezembro, Tel: 282 422 087.

Look out for

The award-winning museum, Museu de Portimão, is housed in what was one of the main sardine factories and is a fascinating glimpse into the importance of the fishing industry for the Algarve region.

Beautiful Azulejos (traditional Portuguese tilework) found on the interiors and exteriors of many buildings.

Characterful graffiti and street art.

Take home

Top quality and inexpensive cheese, olive oil, traditional lacework, leather goods, wine and, of course, sardines!

Where to stay

There are a number of accommodation options available in Portimão and the surrounding areas ranging from Pousadas (small guesthouses) to self-catering apartments and larger hotels. Try:

City Stork Hostel

Rio Arade Algarve Manor House

Getting here

Portugal is easy to get to from many countries, including Senegal. TAP, the Portuguese national carrier, has a direct flight from Dakar every day which takes 3.5 hours. From Lisbon airport you can hire a car, take a bus or a train approximately 2.5 hours south to the Algarve.

2 Comments

A Senegalese Surf Story

Surfing 5

Surfing seems to encompass many of life’s most important feelings and states; you can find yourself being thrashed around, not quite sure where you’ll end up, or on the crest of a wave, perfectly in-sync with the sea. Then there is the downtime of waiting, almost meditatively, for the next wave to come. A delicate balancing act in which you can feel elated or defeated from one fleeting moment to the next.

One of the most surprising things I found when I moved to Dakar was that there was an active local surfing community – local, foreign, male, female, young and old – regularly out riding the crashing waves of the Atlantic, which hugs the city on all sides.

Surfing 4

I have friends who’ve become devotees of the sport, coming back from their mornings or afternoons at the beach sandy, sun-kissed and thoroughly blissed-out at having spent a couple of hours being tossed around by the sea. This made me curious to discover more about this unlikely community, and how the sport has come to find a home in Senegal.

IMG_0641

Jesper Mouritzen has done much to put Senegal on the map as one of the world’s most unique surfing destinations. Jesper, originally from Denmark, first came here on a trip with some friends in 2006. He fell in love with the country, and the surfer’s ‘holy trinity’ of warm water, consistent waves and empty line-ups.

Seven years ago he came back and opened a surf camp on the tiny Island of Ngor, where he lives with his wife and young daughter. I spoke with him about what makes surfing in Senegal special, and about life on Ngor, which only has 25 full-time residents.

Jesper Mouritzen with his family

“I guess the biggest difference here is the local surfers” says Jesper. “They’re open, welcoming and very friendly to foreigners. This can be the dark side of surfing in most places; an aggressive local surf scene trying to scare tourists away so they can have the waves to themselves. The thing that’s most positive about surfing in Senegal are the amazing locals giving everyone a good experience. ”

Surfing 3

Surfing 1

Another distinctive feature about surfing here is that the waves come in from the North Atlantic swell in winter, and the South Atlantic swell in the summer, making Senegal one of the only year-round surfing destinations in the world.

Ngor Island, five minutes by Pirogue from Dakar’s mainland, is home to Senegal’s most famous wave, Ngor Right, which was featured in the classic 1960’s surf movie The Endless Summer.

www-gosurf-dk-ngor-island-air-go-pro-shot

There are no cars on the Island, just some beach restaurants, narrow cobbled streets, sandy pathways and, at almost every turn, stunning views back to the mainland.

The air is clean and pollution free, everything runs on solar power, and the waters are some of the cleanest you’ll find in Dakar. It’s the perfect escape from the hustle and bustle of the city, and the ideal place to unwind after a long day out in the surf.

ander-kouka-big-ngor-001

www-gosurf-dk-view-ngor-island-surf-camp

Despite the welcoming locals and consistent, high-quality waves, Senegal remains an up-and-coming surf destination, rather than an established one. This is due in large part, explains Jesper, to preconceptions and unfounded fears about travelling in Africa.

IMG_0056

But as evidenced by the high return visitor rate at Jesper’s surf camp, those who do make it here are quick to fall in love with the laidback lifestyle of Ngor Island, and the magic of a never-ending surf season in this off-the-beaten-track surfer’s paradise.

 

To find out more about Ngor Island Surf Camp see their website here.

Don’t forget to subscribe to Palm Tree Tea by adding your email address to the form on right!

1 Comment

Aissa Dione : The Grand Dame of the West African Textile Industry

Aissa Dione
Aissa Dione (photo provided by Aissa Dione Tissus)

Writing our first Palm Tree Tea and Afterblixen blogs collaboration on the eve of March 8th, International Women’s Day, it’s very fitting that our chosen subject is Aissa Dione, the grand dame of the West African textile industry.

Almost thirty years ago, Dione started her textile workshop with the last remaining master weavers of the Mandjaque peoples in Senegal. Since then, she has grown her business, Aissa Dione Tissus, into an internationally recognised luxury brand, provided over a hundred jobs, and preserved precious skills that were on the brink of being lost.

Her textiles have been used to produce home décor and fashion accessories by some of the finest design brands around the world such as Hermés, Fendi, Christian Lacroix and Peter Marino to name a few.

Dione, born to a Senegalese father and a French mother, spent the early part of her life in France, moving to Senegal in her twenties to pursue a career as an artist. After receiving commissions to decorate homes and offices around Dakar, news of her talents quickly spread and she grew a large local and international client base.

Textile weaving and dyeing in West Africa is an ancient tradition which dates back to the 15th Century. Dione used her background in fine art to create a product that respected this tradition, but was more commercially viable for the global market by adjusting the dimensions and colour palette of the textiles.

The results are rich and sumptuous, with her intricately woven designs providing an understated shimmer and luminosity to furniture upholstery, shoes, bags, wallets, pillowcases and an array of other elegant accessories.

A trip to her gallery and shop in Dakar is a feast for the eyes, and provides lots of home décor inspiration; all the furniture is designed and produced by Dione and the art on the walls is by local artists that she champions. Everything is available to purchase, or you can work with her directly for a customised design.

What we find truly appealing about Dione as an entrepreneur is not just her revival of the Senegalese woven textile industry, her job creation or beautiful products, but that her vision is one that encompasses the whole cotton supply chain; from production to processing through to manufacturing of the end product.

She believes that through targeted investments in the whole supply chain it’s possible to build an economically viable local cotton industry based on small production units, like the one she has successfully created. A vision where quality and local craftsmanship, rather than quantity are the essence, even if it means ‘swimming against the tide’ of how mainstream manufacturing and import/export models work in Africa.

Dione is discreet and unassuming in her manner, but her achievements speak volumes about her tenacity and vision, and celebrate the exceptional talent of Senegal’s traditional weavers, and its fine materials (the country’s cotton is among the world’s finest).

Her story is one of passion, dedication and determination. She has persevered, against the odds, to almost single-handedly keep the ancient art of Senegalese Mandjaque weaving alive, created luxury fabrics using home-grown cotton and successfully exported this unique cultural heritage to the rest of the world.

Dione should be an inspiration to a whole new generation of entrepreneurs to start turning the riches of this continent into tangible products that can be shared with the world. She proves it can be done, and that it can be done in style.

 

Watch a short interview with Aissa here, and see the master weavers at work here.

For more information including contact details for the gallery and shop, please see the Aissa Dione Tissus website or facebook page.

2 Comments

Dakar’s Islands : Île de Gorée

IMG_7890

Dakar is surrounded by three beautiful islands; to the west of the city is the Îles des Madeleines nature reserve, to the north lies Ngor, a go-to spot for surfers, and finally to the east is Gorée, a Unesco World Heritage Site which houses the Maison des Esclaves (House of Slaves), a museum and memorial to the Transatlantic Slave Trade.

Gorée wasn’t one of the principal centres for the slave trade in West Africa, but the Maison des Esclaves has become the most famous symbol of this time.

IMG_7964

It’s a truly emotive experience to see the place where thousands of people torn from their communities and families waited – in unimaginable conditions – to face a perilous journey across the ocean into a life of servitude, and one which no trip to Dakar is complete without.

Portal_of_sorrow-senegal-01
The ‘Door of No Return’ which was the final exit point of slaves from Africa to the Americas. (Photo by The Wandering Angel)

But after this dark period in it’s history, Gorée has become a centre for architectural beauty, artistic endeavour and educational excellence.

`

IMG_7986

IMG_7910

Away from the main tourist area, you can wander Gorée’s streets in relative solitude, and discover hidden alleyways, striking colonial architecture, and bougainvillea-clad buildings.

IMG_7914

IMG_8024

Wide baobab-lined avenues are given over to impromptu art displays, and artisans produce beautiful objects in the numerous studios and workshops dotted around the island.

IMG_7895

A calm and sheltered bay provides an excellent swimming spot, or just a place to dip your toes in the water while you wait for the ferry back to the mainland.

IMG_8041

IMG_8027

IMG_7904

The Island is also home to the Maison d’Education Mariama Ba, a top boarding school for girls which was founded in the 1970’s by Leopold Senghor, the first president of Senegal.

Each year, it admits twenty-five girls from across the country on the basis of outstanding achievement in their national secondary school exams, and puts them on a path to a bright future – surely the best tribute to all those who were denied their freedoms in times gone by.

IMG_8023

Gorée is small, but each time I go there I discover something new – an artist’s studio, a secret courtyard, an intriguing doorway into an ancient mariner’s drinking spot. There’s always a new story waiting around every corner of this island’s cobbled streets; a whisper from the past, or a glimpse into a promising future.

2 Comments

Papaya and Hibiscus Tea Smoothie

Inspired by my recent visit to the Lou Bess? Dakar Farmers Market and the wonderful array of local products I found there such as moringa and baobab powders, and lemongrass, hibiscus and kinkeliba teas, I thought about how I could combine some of these flavours to create a uniquely West African drink.

The result is a Papaya and Hibiscus Tea Smoothie, with a baobab powder boost. Adding tea to a smoothie is a great way of introducing an extra depth of flavour and added nutrients without adding calories. The sweetness of the papaya balances out the naturally tart flavours of the baobab and hibiscus, and the overall result is a zingy and refreshing antioxidant-infused treat.

Dried hibiscus flowers and baobab fruit

Here’s a closer look at some of the ingredients:

Hibiscus tea or Bissap, is a popular drink across West Africa. It helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol, supports a healthy immune system, and has an anti-inflammatory effect on the body.

Baobab fruit has received a lot of attention in recent years as an African superfood, and deservedly so. It contains more vitamin c than oranges, more calcium than milk and a host of minerals like iron and magnesium.

Papaya is a rich source of antioxidants such as carotenes, and contains vitamin c and fibre.

I’ve been drinking this tasty concoction as a caffeine-free boost when my energy levels start to flag, and as a nutritious alternative to a cup of coffee or sugary snack mid-afternoon.

Recipe:

One tablespoon of dried hibiscus flowers (or a hibiscus tea bag)

A quarter of a medium sized papaya cut into chunks

One tablespoon of baobab fruit powder

One cup of milk (your choice of soy, almond, cow’s etc.)

A couple of teaspoons of honey

Half a teaspoon of ground cinnamon (optional)

Steep the hibiscus flowers (or tea bag) in a cup of boiling water for 3-5 minutes then strain.

Place the liquid from the hibiscus and all the rest of the ingredients into a blender.

Blend until a creamy consistency is achieved.

And enjoy your Papaya and Hibiscus Tea Smoothie; packed with West African flavours and bursting with vitamins and antioxidants. Your body will thank you for it!

 

You can easily make substitutions to this recipe to add variety. For a Southern African twist why not try rooibos instead of hibiscus tea, or mango instead of papaya?

2 Comments